Tux Paint
version 0.9.27
Installation Documentation

Copyright © 2002-2021 by various contributors; see AUTHORS.
http://www.tuxpaint.org/

September 17, 2021


Table of Contents

Requirements

Simple DirectMedia Layer library (libSDL)

Tux Paint requires the Simple DirectMedia Layer Library (libSDL), an Open Source multimedia programming library available under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL).

Along with libSDL, Tux Paint depends on a number of other SDL 'helper' libraries: SDL_Image (for graphics files), SDL_gfx (for some graphical functions, like rotation), SDL_TTF and (optionally) SDL_Pango (for True Type Font support) and, optionally, SDL_Mixer (for sound effects).

Linux/Unix Users:

The SDL libraries are available as source-code, or as RPM or Debian packages for various distributions of Linux. They can be downloaded from:

They are also typically available along with your Linux distribution (e.g. on an installation media, or available via package maintainance software like Debian's "apt").

Note: When installing libraries from packages, be sure to ALSO install the development versions of the packages. (For example, install both "SDL-1.2.4.rpm" and "SDL-1.2.4-devel.rpm".)

Other Libraries

Tux Paint also takes advantage of a number of other free, LGPL'd libraries. Under Linux, just like SDL, they should either already be installed, or are readily available for installation as part of your Linux distribution.

libPNG

Tux Paint uses PNG (Portable Network Graphics) format for its data files. SDL_image will require libPNG be installed.

http://www.libpng.org/pub/png/libpng.html

gettext

Tux Paint uses your system's locale settings along with the "gettext" library to support various languages (e.g., Spanish). You'll need the gettext library installed.

http://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/

libpaper (Linux/Unix only)

As of Tux Paint 0.9.17, Tux Paint can determine your system's default paper size (e.g., A4 or Letter), or can be told to use a particular paper size, thanks to "libpaper".

https://github.com/naota/libpaper

FriBiDi

Tux Paint's "Text" and also "Label" tools support bidirectional languages, thanks to the "FriBiDi" library.

http://fribidi.org/

SVG graphics support

As of Tux Paint 0.9.17, Tux Paint can load SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) images as stamps. Two sets of libraries are supported, and SVG support can be completely disabled (via "make SVG_LIB:=")

librsvg-2 & libCairo2 (newer libraries)
Older SVG libraries

Animated GIF Export feature

To support export of animated GIFs (slideshows), the "libimagequant" library (from the "pngquant2" project) is required.

https://github.com/ImageOptim/libimagequant

NetPBM Tools (optional) No longer used, by default

Under Linux and Unix, earlier versions of Tux Paint used the NetPBM tools to assist with printing. (A PNG is generated by Tux Paint, and converted into a PostScript using the 'pngtopnm' and 'pnmtops' NetPBM command-line tools.)

http://netpbm.sourceforge.net/


Compiling and Installation

Tux Paint is released under the GNU General Public License (GPL) (see "COPYING.txt" for details), and therefore the 'source code' to the program is available freely.

Windows Users

November 3, 2021 Shin-ichi TOYAMA shin1@wmail.plala.or.jp <shin1@wmail.plala.or.jp>

Compiling Set-Up

As of February 2005 (starting with Tux Paint 0.9.15), the "Makefile" includes support for building on a Windows system using MinGW/MSYS (https://sourceforge.net/projects/msys2/).

Many tools and libraries are required to build Tux Paint. The package management system "pacman" helps you install them automatically solving complicated dependencies.

Download the latest MSYS2 environment from https://sourceforge.net/projects/msys2/files/Base/ and install it where you'd like (the default is "C:\msys64")

Open the MSYS2 shell from the "Start Menu" -> "MSYS2 64bit" -> "MSYS2 MSYS" and execute following command (press [Enter] or [Return] to accept the defaults for all questions):

pacman -Syu

This will update core system and the window will close automatically. Repeat the steps above one more time to finish the remaining update process.

Within the MSYS2 shell, run the following command to install basic development tools:

pacman -S base-devel msys2-devel git

Proceed to the next "MinGW 64bit (x86_64) toolchains" section, or skip to the "MinGW 32bit (i686) toolchains" section if you need only a 32bit build environment.


MinGW 64bit (x86_64) toolchains

Within the MSYS2 shell, run the following command to install basic 64bit development tools:

pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-toolchain

64bit (x86_64) dependency libraries for Tux Paint

You can install tools and libraries required for compiling Tux Paint on MSYS2/MINGW using "pacman" except for SDL_Pango.

"ntldd" is a small tool which examine windows executable files to list Dynamic Link Library (.dll) files they depends on. Tux Paint's packaging process for binary distribution uses it to find required .dll files.

FLTK is a cross-platform GUI toolkit used by "Tux Paint Config.". You can skip installing it if you are only building "Tux Paint".

$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-SDL_{image,mixer,ttf,gfx}
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-librsvg
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-fribidi
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-libimagequant
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-fltk
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-ntldd-git

Note: Close the shell before proceeding to the remaining process.

Install SDL_Pango on the 64bit environment

SDL_Pango should be installed manually.

This time, use the MinGW "64bit" shell. Open the shell from the "Start Menu" -> "MSYS2 64bit" -> "MSYS2 MinGW 64-bit"

SDL_Pango

At first, you have to prepare source tar-ball and a required patch in the same directory.

Build and install SDL_Pango as follows.

$ tar zxvf SDL_Pango-0.1.2.tar.gz
$ cd SDL_Pango-0.1.2/
$ patch -p0 < ../SDL_Pango-configure-extra-api.patch
$ ./configure --prefix=/mingw64 && make && make install

Proceed to the next "MinGW 32bit (i686) toolchains" section, or skip to the "ImageMagick" section if you need only a 64bit build environment.


MinGW 32bit (i686) toolchains

Within the MSYS2 shell, run the following command to install basic 32bit development tools:

pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-toolchain

32bit (i686) dependency libraries for Tux Paint

You can install tools and libraries required for compiling Tux Paint on MSYS2/MINGW using "pacman" except for SDL_Pango.

"ntldd" is a small tool which examine windows executable files to list Dynamic Link Library (.dll) files they depends on. Tux Paint's packaging process for binary distribution uses it to find required .dll files.

FLTK is a cross-platform GUI toolkit used by "Tux Paint Config.". You can skip installing it if you are only building "Tux Paint".

$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-SDL_{image,mixer,ttf,gfx}
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-librsvg
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-fribidi
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-libimagequant
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-fltk
$ pacman -S mingw-w64-i686-ntldd-git

Note: Close the shell before proceeding to the remaining process.

Install SDL_Pango on the 32bit environment

SDL_Pango should be installed manually.

This time, use the MinGW "32bit" shell. Open the shell from the "Start Menu" -> "MSYS2 64bit" -> "MSYS2 MinGW 32-bit"

SDL_Pango

At first, you have to prepare source tar-ball and a required patch in the same directory.

Build and install SDL_Pango as follows.

$ tar zxvf SDL_Pango-0.1.2.tar.gz
$ cd SDL_Pango-0.1.2/
$ patch -p0 < ../SDL_Pango-configure-extra-api.patch
$ ./configure --prefix=/mingw32 && make && make install


ImageMagick

ImageMagick is a compilation of command line tools to create, edit, compose, or convert bitmap images supporting quite a large number of image formats. Tux Paint uses two functions ("convert" and "composite") in it to generate thumbnails for startar images and templates during the build process.

Using official binary release available from "Windows Binary Release" is recommended, due to the commands installed with "pacman" on MinGW/MSYS not working as expected!

Do not forget to enable "Install legacy utilities (e.g. convert)" while installing it, because Tux Paint's build process uses them.

Add the path to the directory in which ImageMagick is installed at the top of your "PATH" environment variable. For example:

$ export PATH=/c/Program\ Files/ImageMagick-7.0.10-Q16-HDRI:$PATH

You can make this permanent by adding the above to your the BASH shell configuration file, "~/.bash_profile".


Tux Paint

You can compile 64bit binaries using MSYS2 64bit shell, and 32bit binaries using MSYS2 32bit shell, respectively.

  • Select "MSYS2 64bit" -> "MSYS2 MinGW 64-bit" from the "Start Menu" to open the 64bit shell.
  • Select "MSYS2 64bit" -> "MSYS2 MinGW 32-bit" from the "Start Menu" to open the 32bit shell.

Compile Tux Paint with the following command:

$ make bdist-win32

Note: At this point, you will want to build "Tux Paint Config." for Windows, so it can be included along with "Tux Paint", if you're making an official (or test) release. The build process will look for it in a directory named "tuxpaint-config" (with no version number, e.g., "tuxpaint-config-X.Y.Z"). See "Tux Paint Config."'s INSTALL.txt documentation for details.

All the files needed for starting Tux Paint (and Tux Paint Config.) are collected in the directory for binary distribution "bdist" directory under "win32". You can start them by double-clicking their executable (.exe) files in the "bdist" directory.


Building the Tux Paint Windows Installer:

Inno Setup is used to build executable installer for Tux Paint. Therefore you have to install it in the first place.

Inno Setup officially supports translations for only about 20 languages. However, one of the great points of Tux Paint is it supports so many languages. Therefore, the set up script "tuxpaint.iss" to build the installer is written to use much more translations including unofficial one which are available on "Inno Setup Translations". You have to download translation files (.isl) required and put them in "Languages" directory under the directory in which Inno Setup is installed.

Before building an installer, edit the "tuxpaint.iss" file and enable one of the lines starting with "#define BuildTarget=", depending on the architecture of the installer you want to create.

Then, you can easily build an executable installer by right-clicking on the "tuxpaint.iss" icon in the "win32" directory and selecting "Compile" on the list. It will run for a while, and eventually you will find a "tuxpaint-X.Y.Z-windows-<arch>-installer.exe" file in the same directory.


Running the Tux Paint Windows Installer:

Double-click the Tux Paint installer executable (.EXE file) and follow the instructions.

First, you will be asked to read the license. (It is the GNU General Public License (GPL), which is also available as "COPYING.txt".)

You will then be asked whether you want to install shortcuts to Tux Paint in your Windows Start Menu and on your Windows Desktop. (Both options are set by default.)

Then you will be asked where you wish to install Tux Paint. The default should be suitable, as long as there is space available. Otherwise, pick a different location.

At this point, you can click 'Install' to install Tux Paint!


Changing the Settings Using the Shortcut:

To change program settings, right-click on the TuxPaint shortcut and select 'Properties' (at the bottom).

Make sure the 'Shortcut' tab is selected in the window that appears, and examine the 'Target:' field. You should see something like this:

"C:\Program Files\TuxPaint\TuxPaint.exe"

You can now add command-line options which will be enabled when you double-click the icon.

For example, to make the game run in fullscreen mode, with simple shapes (no rotation option) and in French, add the options (after 'TuxPaint.exe'), like so:

"C:\Program Files\TuxPaint\TuxPaint.exe" -f -s --lang french

(See the main documentation for a full list of available command-line options.)

If you make a mistake or it all disappears use [Ctrl] + [Z] to undo or just hit the [Esc] key and the box will close with no changes made (unless you pushed the "Apply" button!).

When you have finished, click "OK."


If Something Goes Wrong:

If, when you double-click on the shortcut to run Tux Paint, nothing happens, it is probably because some of these command-line options are wrong. Open an Explorer like before, and look for a file called "stderr.txt" in the TuxPaint folder.

It will contain a description of what was wrong. Usually it will just be due to incorrect character-case (capital 'Z' instead of lowercase 'z') or a missing (or extra) '-' (dash).


Linux/Unix Users

Compiling:

Note: Tux Paint does not use autoconf/automake, so there is no "./configure" script to run. Compiling should be straight-forward though, assuming everything Tux Paint needs is installed.

To compile the program from source, simply run the following command from a shell prompt (e.g., "$"):

$ make

Disabling SVG support (and hence Cairo, libSVG, and svg-cairo dependencies):

To disable SVG support (e.g., if your system is not currently supported by the Cairo library or other SVG-related dependencies), you can run "make" with "SVG_LIB= SVG_CFLAGS= NOSVGFLAG=NOSVG" added:

$ make SVG_LIB= SVG_CFLAGS=

Disabling Pango support (and hence Pango, Cairo, etc. dependencies):

Prior to version 0.9.18, Tux Paint used the libSDL_ttf library for rendering text using TrueType Fonts. Since 0.9.18, libSDL_Pango is used, as it has much greater support for internationalization. However, if you wish to disable the use of SDL_Pango, you may do so running "make" with "SDL_PANGO_LIB=" added:

$ make SDL_PANGO_LIB=

Disabling Sound at Compile-time:

If you don't have a sound card, or would prefer to build the program with no sound support (and therefore without a the SDL_mixer dependency), you can run "make" with "SDL_MIXER_LIB=" added:

$ make SDL_MIXER_LIB=

Other options:

Various other options (e.g., installation paths) may be overridden; see them in "Makefile" for further details.


If you get errors:

If you receive any errors during compile-time, make sure you have the appropriate libraries installed (see above). If using packaged versions of the libraries (e.g., RPMs under RedHat or DEBs under Debian), be sure to get the corresponding "-dev" or "-devel" packages as well, otherwise you won't be able to compile Tux Paint (and other programs) from source!


Installng:

Assuming no fatal errors occured, you can now install the program so that it can be run by users on the system. By default, this must be done by the "root" user ('superuser'). Switch to "root" by typing the command:

$ su

Enter "root"'s password at the prompt. You should now be "root" (with a prompt like "#"). To install the program and its data files, type:

# make install

Finally, you can switch back to your regular user by exiting superuser mode:

# exit

Alternatively, you may be able to simply use the "sudo" command (e.g., on Ubuntu Linux):

$ sudo make install

Note: By default, "tuxpaint", the executable program, is placed in "/usr/local/bin/". The data files (images, sounds, etc.) are placed in "/usr/local/share/tuxpaint/".

Changing Where Things Go

You can change where things will go by setting "Makefile"variables on the command line. "DESTDIR" is used to place output in a staging area for package creation. "PREFIX" is the basis of where all other files go, and is, by default, set to "/usr/local".

Other variables are:

BIN_PREFIX
Where the "tuxpaint" binary will be installed. (Set to "$(PREFIX)/bin" by default - e.g., "/usr/local/bin")
DATA_PREFIX
Where the data files (sound, graphics, brushes, stamps, fonts) will go, and where Tux Paint will look for them when it's run. (Set to "$(PREFIX)/share/tuxpaint")
DOC_PREFIX
Where the documentation text files (the "docs" directory) will go. (Set to "$(PREFIX)/share/doc/tuxpaint")
MAN_PREFIX
Where the manual page for Tux Paint will go. (Set to "$(PREFIX)/share/man")
ICON_PREFIX$(PREFIX)/share/pixmaps
X11_ICON_PREFIX$(PREFIX)/X11R6/include/X11/pixmaps
GNOME_PREFIX$(PREFIX)/share/gnome/apps/Graphics
KDE_PREFIX$(PREFIX)/share/applnk/Graphics
Where the icons and launchers (for GNOME and KDE) will go.
LOCALE_PREFIX
Where the translation files for Tux Paint will go, and where Tux Paint will look for them. (Set to "$(PREFIX)/share/locale/") (Final location of a translation file will be under the locale's directory (e.g., "es" for Spanish), within the "LC_MESSAGES" subdirectory.)

Note: This list is out of date. See "Makefile" and "Makefile-i18n" for a complete list.


macOS Users

September 21, 2021 Mark K. Kim <markuskimius@gmail.com>

Tux Paint 0.9.22 and earlier required building Tux Paint from the Xcode IDE. Starting with 0.9.23, however, Tux Paint for macOS is built as though it were a Linux application.

Prerequisites

Although Tux Paint is built without the Xcode IDE, Xcode itself is still required to build Tux Paint. Download it from the App Store, and launch it once to accept its license agreements. You may also need to install the Xcode command line tools using the command:

xcode-select --install

Building Tux Paint also requires various libraries. We install them from MacPorts where possible, source code otherwise. Install MacPorts to the default /opt/local path according to the instructions found on their website: https://www.macports.org/

  • ImageMagick
  • cairo
  • fribidi
  • lbzip2
  • libimagequant*
  • libpaper
  • libpng
  • librsvg
  • libsdl
  • libsdl_image
  • libsdl_mixer
  • libsdl_pango
  • libsdl_ttf
  • libsdl_gfx
  • pkgconfig
  • zlib
... but you should install any package that is required by the latest version of Tux Paint.

* Not available from MacPorts as of this writing, see below.

libimagequant

libimagequant is not available from MacPorts as of this writing. It can be installed from the source code as follows. It should be installed to /opt/local (same as MacPorts) for the library to be included in TuxPaint.dmg.

$ git clone https://github.com/ImageOptim/libimagequant.git
$ cd libimagequant
$ ./configure --prefix=/opt/local
$ make
$ sudo make install

WARNING: Having any UNIX-like toolset installed on your Mac besides MacPorts and Xcode, such as Fink or Brew, will prevent your app bundle from being portable. Be sure Fink and Brew are not accessible from your build environment.


How to Build

Simply, run:

% make
% make install
... to create the TuxPaint.app application bundle that can be run in-place or copied to /Applications. It also creates TuxPaint.dmg for distribution.


Known Issues

  • A macOS binary built on a specific version of macOS only runs on that version of macOS or later. To ensure Tux Paint can run on the oldest version of macOS possible, build it on the oldest version of macOS available. As of this writing we know Tux Paint cannot be built to run on macOS 10.7 or earlier.

    See "Old Versions of macOS" below for best-effort instructions on how to obtain, install, and build Tux Paint on an old version of macOS.

Old Versions of macOS

Some old versions of macOS can be downloaded from Apple's support page: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT211683

macOS does allow dual booting of multiple versions of the OS, but it's safer and easier to install the old macOS onto a flash drive. Wherever you're installing it, the target drive's partitioniong scheme and partition type must match what the old macOS expects, so use the Disk Utility to partition and format the flash drive accordingly.

As of this writing, the oldest version of macOS available on Apple's support site is Yosemite 10.10, which expects "GPT (GUID Partition Table)" partitioning scheme instead of the older MBR scheme, and "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)" as the partition type instead of the newer APFS partition type.

Upon launching the installer, if you get a popup about macOS being too old or new to be installed, a bootable installer can be created using the instructions found here: https://support.apple.com/en-mide/HT201372

It has been found that macOS can be installed onto the bootable media itself, so you can make the flash drive into a bootable installer then install the old macOS onto the same flash drive.

Once the old macOS is installed, you may find the Xcode on the App Store is too new to run on the version of the old macOS. Old versions of Xcode can be downloaded from Apple's Developer site in an area accessible with free registration: https://developer.apple.com/download/more/

The list of macOS versions and the last version of Xcode compatible with them are laid out nicely on the Wikipedia page on Xcode: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xcode#Version_comparison_table

And because Xcode is being installed manually, you can skip the step to install the Xcode command line tools (do not run "xcode-select --install") but otherwise build Tux Paint using the same steps described in the earlier part of this document.


Debugging

Debugging output — to "STDOUT" on Linux and Unix, to a "stdout.txt" file on Windows, and to the file "/tmp/tuxpaint.log" on macOS — can be enabled by setting "DEBUG" (and, if verbose logging is wanted, "VERBOSE") #defines in "src/debug.h" and (re)compiling Tux Paint.

Uninstalling Tux Paint

Windows

Using the Uninstaller

If you installed the Start Menu shortcuts (the default), then go to the TuxPaint folder and select "Uninstall". A box will be displayed that will confirm that you are about to uninstall Tux Paint and, if you are certain that you want to permanently remove Tux Paint, click on the 'Uninstall' button.

When it has finished, click on the close button.

Using the Control Panel

It is also possible to use the entry "TuxPaint (remove only)" in the Control Panel Add/Remove programs section.


macOS

Delete "TuxPaint.app" from the "Applications" folder. Data files, including the configuration files, stamps, and saved pictures, may be found in "Library/Application Support/TuxPaint" (all users) and "/Users/USERNAME/Library/Application Support/TuxPaint" (individual users).


Linux

Within the Tux Paint source directory (where you compiled Tux Paint), you can use the "make uninstall" target to uninstall Tux Paint. By default, this must be done by the "root" user ('superuser'), but if you installed Tux Paint somewhere else (e.g., using a "PREFIX=..." setting to "make" and "make install"), you may not, and will want to provide those same settings here. (See the installation instructions above for further information.)